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trademarks Archives

Diligent research could help businesses avoid trademark woes

An increase in commercial opportunities in recent years has contributed to more Connecticut businesses looking to protect unique designs. The World Intellectual Property Organization reports that there has been a sharp rise in the number of trademark application filings: 30 percent in 2017 alone over the previous year. For this reason, businesses are encouraged to be mindful of their trademarks and diligent about their research.

The importance of registering a trademark

In order to thrive and build good relationships with their customers, businesses in Connecticut have to build a strong brand that evokes the right emotions in their customers' minds. One way of achieving this is through the use of a unique and recognizable company name and logo. However, a business may fall into trouble, be it from a legal or marketing perspective, if these designs or names are already in use by other businesses, which is why it is always advisable for a company to protect its trademark.

Protecting trademarks around the world

Businesses in Connecticut with great intellectual property may be wondering how they can most effectively protect themselves outside the borders of the United States. Many know the benefits of having a federal trademark within the country to protect their brand and image. In addition, trademark holders need to constantly be on guard against infringement in order to preserve their exclusive rights. When companies do not register their trademarks, they could face serious risks to their intellectual property. However, all of these provisions only apply within the borders of the United States.

Netflix faces trademark suit involving popular thriller

Connecticut fans of the popular Netflix thriller "Black Mirror: Bandersnatch" may not have given much thought to references made to the "Choose Your Own Adventure" book series. However, the publisher of those books has certainly taken notice of the reference, which is why they have filed a trademark infringement lawsuit against the online streaming and DVD distribution company. In the film, the thriller's protagonist is attempting to adapt a fictional "Choose Your Own Adventure" book into a video game.

Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts in trademark battle

Scouting veterans in Connecticut may be troubled to learn that two classic organizations beloved by many are embroiled in an intellectual property dispute. The Girl Scouts of the USA filed a lawsuit against the Boy Scouts of America, after the Boy Scouts began using the trademarks "Scouts" and "Scouting" for activities for girls. The case was filed in November in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. In their complaint, the Girl Scouts allege that the Boy Scouts' use of these terms for girls' programming has caused confusion among families looking to participate in Girl Scouting.

USPTO warns of trademark scheme

Connecticut residents who have trademarks might want to watch their inboxes for emails from the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The USPTO sent an email out on Oct. 19 to warn about a fraud scheme in which thieves have been trying to hijack trademark files.

The basics of trademark protections

Brand identity is an essential part of growing many types of businesses, and trademarks are one of the legal tools used to help protect those identities. These protections, which used to be actual physical imprints, date back to early societies for use on high-quality artisan goods. Today, the trademark, indicated with a TM symbol, represents the legal protection of both physical and digital products. They are most commonly used on company logos for big corporations in Connecticut and throughout the U.S.

Boy band Menudo resolves trademark dispute

Connecticut fans of Latin music may be interested to learn that after two years of litigation, boy band group Menudo will now be able to resume its relaunch efforts. The group's name was initially transferred back in 2016 but wasn't able to resume its launching efforts due to a trademark dispute. The Puerto Rican group resolved the matter in the United States District Court in Miami. The ruling states that the trademark Menudo belongs exclusively to Menudo International, LLC.

Commodores in a battle over name usage

Music fans in Connecticut may have heard that a former member of the Commodores has been sued for trademark infringement by Commodores Entertainment Corp. (CEC). According to the lawsuit, the former member began performing under the name 'The Commodores Experience featuring Thomas McClary." The lawsuit was filed in 2014, and McClary was barred by a court from using the name in 2016. A court later ruled that he couldn't refer to himself as the founder of the Commodores as it could be confusing to fans.

Popular terms overwhelmingly registered as trademarks

Many Connecticut business owners and entrepreneurs may be considering filing for a trademark for their own products and services. However, they could run into more difficulty than expected, as a new study has found that 81 percent of the most common 1,000 words in the English language are registered as single-word trademarks. The study's authors warned of the potential of future problems with the creation of brand names.

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